Sep 11, 2009

You may recall this man, Troy Davis, who sits on Georgia's Death Row for a crime he might not be guilty of. I wrote about Troy Davis in this post last year. The State of Georgia is hellbent on executing Troy Davis and the sooner the better as far as they are concerned. Exculpatory evidence be damned. Then there is the case of Elvira Zatarain, whom I also posted about just a few weeks ago Mrs. Zatarain is accused by Hooterville's finest of being in possession of fake drugs. The City of Hooterville is hellbent on making this woman admit something, just anything. Yesterday they offered her a plea deal, a $130 fine, if she would admit that her magic crystals were in fact fake meth. She told them to shove it. Two different cases, one trivial, one as serious as a heart attack, but with a common theme. Both point out how difficult it is for the authorities to admit that they might be wrong. We teach people from kindergarten on that to be convicted is to be proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Yet, when provided ample doubt our law enforcers often turn a blind eye. Things in this blog represented to be fact, may or may not actually be true. The writer is frequently wrong, sometimes just full of it, but always judgmental and cranky

6 comments:

Barbara said...

So many aspects of the way the law is carried out these days disgust me. The letter of the law simply becomes a crutch for those who either won't or can't think. Arghhh!

Kurt said...

They're still bothering the lady with the new age crystals? Yikes!

Megan said...

Wait a second. She has to pay a fine for admitting that the fake drugs were fake?

I need a beer...

mum said...

I'm so happy you mention Troy Davis on your blog.

The point you make is a good one. But it also bears mentioning that Troy is still around today because he hasn't given up and neither have his lawyers and supporters around the world.

Sorry if this sounds like a paid ad for Amnesty International. It isn't. But really - one click on the letters they provide can make the difference for someone fighting for the simple right to a fair trial.

http://www.amnesty.org/fr

cheers from Graulhet

mum said...

oops - that's the French website. Just delete the fr at the end of the address.

Steve said...

We also teach kids that cops are their friends -- which isn't necessarily true.