Aug 28, 2008

"The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country." Lincoln's Second Annual Message to Congress, December 1, 1862. The country anxiously awaits the moment when Barak Obama accepts the nomination for President, in just an hour or two. I remember well, the days when a black mayor in a major American city was ground-breaking. It was inconceivable in those days, that a black man could become President. Perhaps Obama has the vision to lift the country from the malaise we are in. Maybe he will be just the latest face of the status quo. I hope it is the former and not the latter, but I'm not convinced yet. As I watch the coverage on CNN, I am disturbed by the pomp and circumstance that Obama has allowed himself to be swept into. The set at Invesco Field is kind of embarrassing from my point of view and lends to my sinking feeling that at the end of the day, smoke and mirrors will trump substance. The stark reality for Obama is that he will ultimately have the usual suspects in Congress with which to deal. The Congressional Democrats have thus far shown little in the way of visionary thinking and there is no reason to think that Mr. Obama will motivate them to a loftier place. Lobbyists still lurk in the shadows and the backrooms of Washington, enticing public servants to choose self-interest over the public interest. The permanent bureaucracy still stands ready to be the immovable object. It's a huge task. Things in this blog represented to be fact, may or may not actually be true. The writer is frequently wrong, sometimes just full of it, but always judgmental and cranky

11 comments:

The Liberator said...

Wasn't Louis Stokes the first black Mayor? Way back when.

Julia said...

I agree there's only so much a president can do with lobbyists and Congress and the media working against him. I'm split. On one side, I feel optimistic. I think the force of his personality will be able to bring people together and bring real change. On the other side, I see how cynical people are in the media and everywhere else and I see almost insurmountable obstacles. No matter what he does it will always be wrong in the eyes of the partisan.

Megan said...

I'm voting for him. But I sure am glad I don't have to hear the words "Pepsi Center" again.

Kurt said...

I sure wish it mattered who won.

dennis said...

Dennis loves Obama

Nan Patience said...

We have all become so cynical.

tut-tut said...

I refuse to become cynical. I've been energized by Obama from day 1!

It will be an interesting race, with McCain's surprise VP pick, won't it?

Squirrel said...

I agree with Tut Tut--when Obama came on the scene that was it for me. (I wasn't energized by Hilary or the kerry/edwards .) Energized is the word.

Squirrel said...

Merle,

is it true that McCains VP has kids named Track and Trig? what could this mean?

Reya Mellicker said...

What they told me about the set at Mile High is that it was supposed to look like the West Wing of the White House. Kind of an in-joke unless you live in DC.

I could write a lot about how much I've learned about the government since living in DC, but I am kind and I will spare you that rant.

bitchlet said...

As part of our course we're learning about lobbyists, the military industrial complex and right wing think tanks. It's quite fascinating because the same may happen here but its not legit.